Privacy Policy

Shanghai Lilong

"If you enter a longtang, you will find urinals, snack stalls, flies flying in hordes, children fighting in groups, fierce turbulences and sharp curses. What a disorderly small world!" This was what in 1933 Lu Xun wrote in his essay, "Children in Shanghai" to depict a longtang of the lowest class.
Click Here for English text
Clicca qui per leggere in Italiano
Click Here for English text

Walking Shanghai Lilong

"Looked down upon from the highest point in the city, Shanghai’s longtang—her vast neighbourhoods inside enclosed alleys—are a magnificent sight. The longtang are the backdrop of this city. Streets and buildings emerge around them in a series of dots and lines, like the subtle brushstrokes that bring life to the empty expanses of white paper in a traditional Chinese landscape painting. " This is the opening of Wang Anyi 1995 novel "Song of Everlasting Sorrow" (长恨歌).

lilong_sample_paint_700

According to what Wang describes in her novel, the longtang seem to embody the essence of Shanghai culture that has survived in spite of a brutal history, but is now about to vanish: "Amid the forest of new skyscrapers, these old longtang neighbourhoods are like a fleet of sunken ships, their battled hulls exposed as the sea dries up".
Lilong 里弄 is the Shanghai term for Longtang 弄堂 "lane houses" a group of houses that reflect the compositional layout of the Londoners' lane houses in the half of the nineteenth century seeing through the prism of the Chinese traditional housing.
Lilong: "Li" means neighbourhoods, "Long" means lanes. These two words are combined to describe an urban housing form which has characterized the city of Shanghai for 150 years. Being an integral part of the city growth from 1840 to 1949, Lilong settlements represented the majority of housing stock in the city centre until the end of the 20th century.
In 1963 the Communist Party's Shanghai committee defined Lilong: "the frontier posts for class struggle, the home front of production, places of living, and important battle positions for the struggle to foster the proletariat and destroy the bourgeoisie".

Longtang Structure
The Lilong settlement, as a low-rise, ground-related housing pattern, has many advantageous features: an hierarchical spatial organization network, the separation of public and private zones, a high degree of safety control, a strong sense of neighbourly interaction and social cohesiveness, and so on. These factors make the lilong neighbourhoods a pleasant place to live and hence they are loved by the local populace.
The whole settlement has a couple of main lanes, used as the major circulation passages, which are accessible from the commercial streets.
The side laws, leading to each housing units, connect to the main lanes. The clear, rational structure of a lilong settlement gives a high degree of secuLilong-Settlement_400rity and quietness to its internal living environment, contrary to its noisy urban surrounding dominated by commercial developments. The front housing units along the perimeter of a lilong settlement are generally converted to shops as well as some housing units inside the settlement, have also integrated small-scaled, home-based businesses to provide the daily amenities of the entire community.Shanghai-longtang_paint_600
Varying architectural types and different grades of residential homes served different social classes and evolved in time. The shikumen (Shikumen 石库门"Stone Warehouse Gate" is one of the housing styles of lilong) residences were originally built, after 1842 at the end of the first opium war, for prosperous families, foreign residents, white-collar workers, and middle-class residents, who were going to populate the new foreign concession after the Treaty of Nanking. But as the maintenance of the buildings fell into disrepair, population density increased, facilities became outmoded, buildings became increasingly makeshift, and living conditions worsened. Some neighbourhoods gradually degenerated to house society’s lower classes, and others became slums.

Longtang Evolution
As the forces of globalization sweep across the world, many cities, especially in developing countries, rush to catch up with the opportunity for their economic and social development; meanwhile they anxiously dismantle massive traditionally low-density communities to meet with the over-expanding housing demand and economic growth.
Since the economic reforms of 1990, people nationwide have surged into Shanghai for better job opportunities, which resulted in the housing crunch. To meet the explosive housing demand, the government approved the “sweep-out” reform policy to replace the low-density residences with grand, but inhospitable, high-rise dwellings. Then the urban heritage gradually dies out in the disordered urban fabric as a result of mass-produced housing projects.
Viewed from the architectural and urban cultural respects, it decreased the architectural diversity in this historic city, destroyed the original urban fabric and changed social lifestyle.

In general, living in a longtang is not free from problems: there is no privacy in the longtangs. Neighbours cook together, and usually eat dinner outside, where they can see what other families are eating, toilets and washrooms are shared, if there are quarrels between families, everyone in the neighbourhood gets involved. So people often prefer leaving their neighbourhood and moving to ‘modern’ houses but, they are often not aware of the big change is going to happen to their lives.
The historic and culturally influenced neighbourhood died out along with the traditional residences.
The errors being made in Shanghai, however, will be glaringly obvious to anyone who knows urban planning and development. After all, many of the mistakes that Shanghai is making are mistakes that North America and Europe pioneered.
The arising question now is, if it is possible to preserve the character of the traditional street life within the contemporary social models, of economic growth and higher density requirements. How can the public and private spaces of contemporary Shanghai communities be organized to reflect traditional street life that promotes interpersonal and community interaction?

Is the lilong unique fate to be turned into high-rise dwellings or Disney-like areas?
After years of large-scale demolition, especially in the occasion of the 2010 World Expo, when inhabitants from tens of thousands of longtang houses were moved to high-density areas in the city suburbs, the government suddenly started propagating lilong as representatives of a unique "Shanghai Culture", starting some programs of restoration.
After many controversial attempts, some different approaches emerged.
The reconstruction by preserving the “outer skin” of the residence, and while altering its structure and functions into commercial use as shops, bars and restaurants. With this approach, the monotonous function of use only preserves the skin of the residences, rather than the essence. An example of this solution is the "Shanghai Xintiandi project". "Xintiandi today, is preserving nothing more than a shell, [] the life that once made this place really interesting is gone, perhaps forever", says Wang Anyi.
As the Lilong houses may vary from poor to luxury buildings, in presence of high value architecture like in "Citè Bourgogne" in the French Concession, the restoration was aimed to preserve its residential quality, but the cohabitation of different, unintegrated social groups, prevents the creation of a real social community.
Transform the Lilong houses into Creative Art Park that includes galleries, artist studios, art shops and coffee shops, while the rest of the community is preserved for the residential use as in the "Tianzifang project", is a third kind of approach. Even in this case, the original aim of the Lilong community is destroyed and the large flow of tourism and night life has caused many controversy with the surrounding neighbourhoods, leading the local community into social conflict and chaos.
However this 'bottom-up' approach coming through the initiative of the neighbourhood committees is definitely better than 'top-down' projects like Xintiandi, the result of political and economic interests of the upper-class.

The Theme
Finally, and here we are at the theme of my reportage, the Shanghai municipality allocated some of these traditional-style housings, so called “Model Quarters” (文明小区) to rather poor city dwellers connected with a redevelopment program and providing a minimum of facilities.
I am personally convinced that this project represents an interesting compromise, but the precariousness of the existing living standard and the pressure of large economic interests related to the intensive exploitation of the territory, make the survival of these settlements really uncertain.

My work is focused on some vital and active “Model Quarters” Lilong in the Huangpu district, located around Huangpi (黄陂南路) , south of the Xintiandi Metro Station (新天地) between Huahai Road (淮海中路) and Zhao Zhou Road (肇周路).Here, I’m trying to offer a naive view of the social environment and lifestyle in this relatively poor, but quiet and pleasant place (even if extremely chaotic), where it is still clearly recognizable a high level of social cohesion, the presence of basic services and facilities, even if in a really humble context.

The tour starts from the external lanes surrounding the lilong, where commercial sites, public spaces and services are located and then ideally goes to the hearth of the neighbourhood.Then following the main and side lanes to meet the people and places where they eat, sleep, chat, play, in short, live and finally return to the crowded and noisy streets.

The photographs do not show beautiful old Western-style buildings, embassies, elegant residences, nor public architecture and monuments, nor pleasant gardens.None of the symbols of the luxurious colonial past or the futuristic buildings of the twenty-first century, Shanghai.

These images are just fragments of ordinary daily life; work, amusements and boredom. The anticipation of nostalgia for things that are doomed to disappear.To conclude with Wang Anyi own words:

“You could say a longtang is a certain type of architecture, but what it actually is, is a way of life.”
Clicca qui per leggere in Italiano

Walking Shanghai Lilong

"Entrando in un longtang, vi troverete orinatoi, chioschi, nugoli di mosche, bambini che si picchiano, litigi feroci e insulti taglienti. Che piccolo mondo disordinato!" Così scriveva nel 1933 Lu Xun nel suo saggio "Bambini di Shanghai" per descrivere un longtang abitato dalle classi più umili.
"Visti dall’alto, i vicoli di Shanghai offrono un panorama magnifico. Formano lo sfondo della città, dal quale le strade e i palazzi emergono simili a linee e punti, mentre i vicoli ne definiscono le sfumature riempiendo lo spazio vuoto, come in un dipinto tradizionale cinese". Questo è l'incipit del romanzo del 1995 di Wang Anyi "La canzone dell'eterno rimpianto" (长恨歌)lilong_sample_paint_700

Secondo quanto descritto da Wang nel suo racconto, i longtang sembrano incarnare l'anima della cultura di Shanghai che è sopravvissuta nonostante una storia brutale, ma è ora vicina a svanire: "In mezzo alla foresta dei nuovi grattaceli, questi vecchi quartieri longtang sono come una flotta di navi affondate, i loro scafi si svelano mano a mano che il mare si ritira" dice ancora Wang Anyi.
Lilong里弄 è in termine Shanghainese per definire un Longtang 弄堂 "case a schiera" cioè un insieme di case che riprendono il layout compositivo delle case a schiera londinesi della metà dell’Ottocento, ripensate sulla base delle tipologie abitative cinesi preesistenti.
Lilong: "Li" significa quartiere, "Long" significa vicolo (lanes in inglese). Queste due parole combinate, descrivono una tipologia di abitazioni che hanno caratterizzato per 150 anni la città di Shanghai. Indissolubilmente connessi con la crescita della città tra il 1840 e il 1949, gli insediamenti Lilong costituivano la maggior parte del patrimonio abitativo della città fino alla fine del ventesimo secolo.

Nel 1963, il Comitato Centrale del Partito Comunista di Shanghai definisce i Lilong come: "l'avamposto della lotta di classe, il caposaldo della produzione, un luogo di vita e un importante presidio per la battaglia del proletariato e la sconfitta della borghesia".

Struttura dei Longtang
L'insediamento lilong è una struttura dal profilo basso, radicata a Lilong-Settlement_400terra che offre agli abitanti numerosi vantaggi: una organizzazione gerarchica dello spazio, separazione fra aree private e pubbliche, alto livello di sicurezza, forte senso di interazione con il vicinato, coesione sociale ecc. Questi fattori, rendono un quartiere lilong un piacevole luogo per vivere e sono di conseguenza generalmente amati dalla popolazione.Dal punto di vista urbanistico, l'intero insediamento è costituito solitamente da due vie principali che si incrociano, utilizzate per la circolazione generale, accessibili dalle vie commerciali esterne e dalle vie secondarie che conducono a ciascuna abitazione.
La semplice e razionale struttura degli insediamenti lilong, conferisce un elevato grado di sicurezza e tranquillità all'ambiente di vita interno, in contrasto con i rumorosi dintorni urbani, dominati dallo sviluppo commerciale.
Le unità abitative lungo il perimetro dei lilong sono state generalmente convertire in negozi così come anche alcune abitazioni, all’interno dell’insediamento, hanno integrato attività commerciali a conduzione famigliare, per fornire servizi alla comunità.
Le case shikumen ( 石库门"Case con l'ingresso di pietra"), tipiche dei primi longtang, furono originariamente costruite, dopo la prima guerra dell'oppio del 1842, per accogliere famiglie facoltose, diplomatici, dirigenti e cittadini della classe media che andavano popolando le concessioni straniere di Shanghai dopo il trattato di Nanchino.Shanghai-longtang_paint_600
Ma gradatamente la manutenzione degli edifici si interruppe, la densità della popolazione aumentò, le strutture diventarono fuori moda, gli edifici si fecero fatiscenti, quindi le condizioni di vita generale degradarono. Fu così che alcuni quartieri cambiarono di rango e furono occupati da classi sociali sempre più povere fino a trasformarsi talvolta in baraccopoli.

Evoluzione dei longtang
Mentre le forze della globalizzazione imperversano nel mondo, molte città, specialmente nei paesi in via di sviluppo, si affannano nel tentativo di recuperare il ritardo del loro progresso economico e sociale, dismettendo in modo massivo le comunità a bassa densità abitativa, per soddisfare la crescente domanda di abitazioni.
Così il patrimonio urbano muore gradatamente per trasformarsi in un ambiente disordinato e alienante, grazie alla frenetica realizzazione di progetti per alloggi di massa costruiti in serie.
A partire dalle riforme economiche del 1990, uomini e donne da tutta la Cina sono confluiti a Shanghai alla ricerca di migliori opportunità di lavoro, fino a provocare la crisi degli alloggi. Per soddisfare l'esplosiva richiesta di case, il governo approvò la riforma detta "sweep-out" (spazzare) per sostituire le case a bassa densità abitativa con enormi ma inospitali grattaceli.
Visto da un punto i vista architettonico e urbanistico, tutto ciò ha diminuito la diversità architettonica di questa storica città, distruggendo il tessuto urbano originale e cambiando lo stile di vita sociale.

Bisogna dire comunque, che vivere in un longtang non è esente da problemi: non c'è molta privacy in questo ambiente, i vicini cucinano insieme e di solito consumano i pasti all'aperto, gomito a gomito con gli altri inquilini, bagni e lavanderie sono in comune e se ci sono litigi fra famiglie, ognuno nel quartiere ne risulterà coinvolto. Di conseguenza, i cittadini sono spesso favorevoli a lasciare il loro quartiere per spostarsi in abitazioni più 'moderne' ma solitamente non sono consci del grande cambiamento che si produrrà nel loro stile di vita.
Il quartiere storico e culturalmente ricco, muore insieme alle case tradizionali.
Gli errori compiuti a Shanghai, risulteranno comunque palesi a chiunque conosca le problematiche della pianificazione urbana e dello sviluppo del territorio. Dopo tutto, molti degli errori che Shanghai sta commettendo sono errori di cui il nord America e l'Europa sono stati pionieri.
La questione che si pone ora è, se è possibile preservare lo stile tradizionale di vita di strada in presenza dei modelli sociali contemporanei, dell'aumento della popolazione e della crescita economica.

Il destino dei lilong dovrà essere necessariamente quello di evolvere in orrendi e impersonali grattacieli o trasformarsi in quartieri Disneyani?
E’ possibile organizzare gli spazi di una città come Shanghai in modo da preservare quella vitalità dei quartieri che promuove i rapporti interpersonali e la vita di comunità?
Dopo anni di demolizioni su larga scala, specialmente in occasione del World Expo del 2010, quando gli abitanti provenienti da decine di migliaia di abitazioni longtang sono stati trasferiti in aree ad alta densità nelle periferie della città, il governo ha improvvisamente iniziato a propagandare i lilong come rappresentativi di una esclusiva "Cultura di Shanghai", iniziando quindi dei programmi di recupero.
In seguito a numerosi tentativi controversi si poi giunti a quattro tipologie di approccio principali, che si sono concretizzate in alcuni progetti già conclusi e altri in via di realizzazione.
In un caso, una ricostruzione tesa a preservare la forma esterna degli edifici, modificando la destinazione d'uso ai soli fini commerciali, come negozi, ristoranti e bar. Questo modello salva la forma esteriore, ma ne limita l'uso, rendendoli privi di anima. Un esempio di questo tipo è costituito dal 'Shanghai Xintiandi Project'. "Xintiandi oggi, non costituisce niente di più di un guscio, [] la vita che rese questo posto veramente interessante è sparita, forse per sempre", scrive Wang.
La tipologia delle abitazioni lilong può variare di molto, da abitazioni misere a palazzi di lusso, di conseguenza, in presenza di un patrimonio architettonico di alto profilo come nel quartiere della 'Citè Bourgogne' nella Concessione Francese, il restauro diviene mirato a conservare la funzione abitativa, ma a progetto compiuto, la coesistenza di gruppi sociali differenti e scarsamente integrati, impedisce la creazione di una reale comunità sociale.
Altro approccio ancora, è costituito dalla trasformazione delle case lilong in un parco delle arti che includa gallerie, studi di artisti, negozi d'arte e coffe shops, mantenendo invece una parte dedicata agli usi residenziali. E' questo il caso del "Tianzifang project". Anche qui, tuttavia lo spirito originale del quartiere è andato in gran parte perduto e a causa del notevole aumento del turismo e della vita notturna, si sono create molte situazioni di caos e di conflitto con le comunità circostanti.
Tuttavia, questo metodo 'dal basso' nato dalla iniziativa dei comitati di quartiere è senz'altro meglio riuscito di progetti 'dall'alto' come Xintinadi, frutto degli interessi politici ed economici delle classi dominanti.

Il tema
Infine, e veniamo quindi all'argomento di questo reportage, la municipalità di Shanghai ha trasformato alcuni di questi quartieri tradizionali in 'Quartieri Modello' (文明小区 'Model Quarter'), collegandoli a un programma di recupero e dotandoli di un minimo di servizi organizzati, assegnando quindi le abitazioni a persone appartenenti a classi sociali svantaggiate.
Sono personalmente convinto che questo progetto rappresenti un interessante compromesso, ma la precarietà del livello di vita esistente e i profondi interessi economici connessi allo sfruttamento intensivo del territorio, renderanno molto precaria la sopravvivenza nel tempo di questi insediamenti.

Il mio lavoro è focalizzato su alcuni attivi e vitali lilong 'Quartieri Modello' nel distretto di Huangpu, situati attorno a Huangpi (黄陂南路) , nella zona a Sud della stazione metro di Xintiandi (新天地) fra Huahai Road (淮海中路) e Zhao Zhou Road (肇周路).Con queste foto, cerco di offrire una visione genuina dell'ambiente sociale e dello stile di vita di un luogo, relativamente povero, ma tranquillo e piacevole (anche se decisamente caotico), dove sono ancora visibili un alto livello di coesione sociale e la presenza di servizi di base, per quanto inseriti in un contesto molto modesto.

L’esplorazione inizia dalle strade esterne che circondano i lilong, dove ci sono le botteghe, gli spazi pubblici e i servizi, per poi penetrare idealmente nel cuore del quartiere, seguendo i vicoli principali e secondari ad incontrare i personaggi e i luoghi dove essi mangiano, chiacchierano, giocano, dormono, vivono insomma.

Le fotografie non mostrano eleganti palazzi, ambasciate, abitazioni in stile occidentale, nessuna architettura pubblica, monumento e nemmeno simpatici giardini. Nessuno dei simboli del fastoso passato coloniale o degli avveniristici palazzi della Shanghai del ventunesimo secolo. Non vedremo nemmeno le eleganti abitazioni Skikumen, lo stile originario degli insediamenti longtang, con i loro eleganti archi di pietra a proteggere il cortile antistante; questi sono quartieri popolari, semplici ed ordinari. Proprio in questa semplicità, in questa ordinarietà dimessa, in questo clima da 'case popolari' ho trovato una dimensione di quiete, una sensazione di calore, un 'ricordo'.

Queste immagini sono solo frammenti della vita di tutti i giorni: lavoro, divertimento, noia. L'anticipazione della nostalgia per le cose che stanno scomparendo.
Dice ancora Wang Anyi in una intervista:

“Tu puoi dire che un longtang è un certo tipo di architettura, ma in realtà, è uno stile di vita”
Click to read more in English

Walking Shanghai Lilong

"If you enter a longtang, you will find urinals, snack stalls, flies flying in hordes, children fighting in groups, fierce turbulences and sharp curses. What a disorderly small world!" This was what in 1933 Lu Xun wrote in his essay, "Children in Shanghai" to depict a longtang of the lowest class.
"Looked down upon from the highest point in the city, Shanghai’s longtang—her vast neighbourhoods inside enclosed alleys—are a magnificent sight. The longtang are the backdrop of this city. Streets and buildings emerge around them in a series of dots and lines, like the subtle brushstrokes that bring life to the empty expanses of white paper in a traditional Chinese landscape painting. " This is the opening of Wang Anyi 1995 novel "Song of Everlasting Sorrow" (长恨歌).

lilong_sample_paint_700

According to what Wang describes in her novel, the longtang seem to embody the essence of Shanghai culture that has survived in spite of a brutal history, but is now about to vanish: "Amid the forest of new skyscrapers, these old longtang neighbourhoods are like a fleet of sunken ships, their battled hulls exposed as the sea dries up".
Lilong 里弄 is the Shanghai term for Longtang 弄堂 "lane houses" a group of houses that reflect the compositional layout of the Londoners' lane houses in the half of the nineteenth century seeing through the prism of the Chinese traditional housing.
Lilong: "Li" means neighbourhoods, "Long" means lanes. These two words are combined to describe an urban housing form which has characterized the city of Shanghai for 150 years. Being an integral part of the city growth from 1840 to 1949, Lilong settlements represented the majority of housing stock in the city centre until the end of the 20th century.
In 1963 the Communist Party's Shanghai committee defined Lilong: "the frontier posts for class struggle, the home front of production, places of living, and important battle positions for the struggle to foster the proletariat and destroy the bourgeoisie".

Longtang Structure
The Lilong settlement, as a low-rise, ground-related housing pattern, has many advantageous features: an hierarchical spatial organization network, the separation of public and private zones, a high degree of safety control, a strong sense of neighbourly interaction and social cohesiveness, and so on. These factors make the lilong neighbourhoods a pleasant place to live and hence they are loved by the local populace.
The whole settlement has a couple of main lanes, used as the major circulation passages, which are accessible from the commercial streets.
The side laws, leading to each housing units, connect to the main lanes. The clear, rational structure of a lilong settlement gives a high degree of secuLilong-Settlement_400rity and quietness to its internal living environment, contrary to its noisy urban surrounding dominated by commercial developments. The front housing units along the perimeter of a lilong settlement are generally converted to shops as well as some housing units inside the settlement, have also integrated small-scaled, home-based businesses to provide the daily amenities of the entire community.Shanghai-longtang_paint_600
Varying architectural types and different grades of residential homes served different social classes and evolved in time. The shikumen (Shikumen 石库门"Stone Warehouse Gate" is one of the housing styles of lilong) residences were originally built, after 1842 at the end of the first opium war, for prosperous families, foreign residents, white-collar workers, and middle-class residents, who were going to populate the new foreign concession after the Treaty of Nanking. But as the maintenance of the buildings fell into disrepair, population density increased, facilities became outmoded, buildings became increasingly makeshift, and living conditions worsened. Some neighbourhoods gradually degenerated to house society’s lower classes, and others became slums.

Longtang Evolution
As the forces of globalization sweep across the world, many cities, especially in developing countries, rush to catch up with the opportunity for their economic and social development; meanwhile they anxiously dismantle massive traditionally low-density communities to meet with the over-expanding housing demand and economic growth.
Since the economic reforms of 1990, people nationwide have surged into Shanghai for better job opportunities, which resulted in the housing crunch. To meet the explosive housing demand, the government approved the “sweep-out” reform policy to replace the low-density residences with grand, but inhospitable, high-rise dwellings. Then the urban heritage gradually dies out in the disordered urban fabric as a result of mass-produced housing projects.
Viewed from the architectural and urban cultural respects, it decreased the architectural diversity in this historic city, destroyed the original urban fabric and changed social lifestyle.

In general, living in a longtang is not free from problems: there is no privacy in the longtangs. Neighbours cook together, and usually eat dinner outside, where they can see what other families are eating, toilets and washrooms are shared, if there are quarrels between families, everyone in the neighbourhood gets involved. So people often prefer leaving their neighbourhood and moving to ‘modern’ houses but, they are often not aware of the big change is going to happen to their lives.
The historic and culturally influenced neighbourhood died out along with the traditional residences.
The errors being made in Shanghai, however, will be glaringly obvious to anyone who knows urban planning and development. After all, many of the mistakes that Shanghai is making are mistakes that North America and Europe pioneered.
The arising question now is, if it is possible to preserve the character of the traditional street life within the contemporary social models, of economic growth and higher density requirements. How can the public and private spaces of contemporary Shanghai communities be organized to reflect traditional street life that promotes interpersonal and community interaction?

Is the lilong unique fate to be turned into high-rise dwellings or Disney-like areas?
After years of large-scale demolition, especially in the occasion of the 2010 World Expo, when inhabitants from tens of thousands of longtang houses were moved to high-density areas in the city suburbs, the government suddenly started propagating lilong as representatives of a unique "Shanghai Culture", starting some programs of restoration.
After many controversial attempts, some different approaches emerged.
The reconstruction by preserving the “outer skin” of the residence, and while altering its structure and functions into commercial use as shops, bars and restaurants. With this approach, the monotonous function of use only preserves the skin of the residences, rather than the essence. An example of this solution is the "Shanghai Xintiandi project". "Xintiandi today, is preserving nothing more than a shell, [] the life that once made this place really interesting is gone, perhaps forever", says Wang Anyi.
As the Lilong houses may vary from poor to luxury buildings, in presence of high value architecture like in "Citè Bourgogne" in the French Concession, the restoration was aimed to preserve its residential quality, but the cohabitation of different, unintegrated social groups, prevents the creation of a real social community.
Transform the Lilong houses into Creative Art Park that includes galleries, artist studios, art shops and coffee shops, while the rest of the community is preserved for the residential use as in the "Tianzifang project", is a third kind of approach. Even in this case, the original aim of the Lilong community is destroyed and the large flow of tourism and night life has caused many controversy with the surrounding neighbourhoods, leading the local community into social conflict and chaos.
However this 'bottom-up' approach coming through the initiative of the neighbourhood committees is definitely better than 'top-down' projects like Xintiandi, the result of political and economic interests of the upper-class.

The Theme
Finally, and here we are at the theme of my reportage, the Shanghai municipality allocated some of these traditional-style housings, so called “Model Quarters” (文明小区) to rather poor city dwellers connected with a redevelopment program and providing a minimum of facilities.
I am personally convinced that this project represents an interesting compromise, but the precariousness of the existing living standard and the pressure of large economic interests related to the intensive exploitation of the territory, make the survival of these settlements really uncertain.

My work is focused on some vital and active “Model Quarters” Lilong in the Huangpu district, located around Huangpi (黄陂南路) , south of the Xintiandi Metro Station (新天地) between Huahai Road (淮海中路) and Zhao Zhou Road (肇周路).Here, I’m trying to offer a naive view of the social environment and lifestyle in this relatively poor, but quiet and pleasant place (even if extremely chaotic), where it is still clearly recognizable a high level of social cohesion, the presence of basic services and facilities, even if in a really humble context.

The tour starts from the external lanes surrounding the lilong, where commercial sites, public spaces and services are located and then ideally goes to the hearth of the neighbourhood.Then following the main and side lanes to meet the people and places where they eat, sleep, chat, play, in short, live and finally return to the crowded and noisy streets.

The photographs do not show beautiful old Western-style buildings, embassies, elegant residences, nor public architecture and monuments, nor pleasant gardens.None of the symbols of the luxurious colonial past or the futuristic buildings of the twenty-first century, Shanghai.

These images are just fragments of ordinary daily life; work, amusements and boredom. The anticipation of nostalgia for things that are doomed to disappear.To conclude with Wang Anyi own words:

“You could say a longtang is a certain type of architecture, but what it actually is, is a way of life.”
Click per leggere in Italiano

Walking Shanghai Lilong

"Entrando in un longtang, vi troverete orinatoi, chioschi, nugoli di mosche, bambini che si picchiano, litigi feroci e insulti taglienti. Che piccolo mondo disordinato!" Così scriveva nel 1933 Lu Xun nel suo saggio "Bambini di Shanghai" per descrivere un longtang abitato dalle classi più umili.
"Visti dall’alto, i vicoli di Shanghai offrono un panorama magnifico. Formano lo sfondo della città, dal quale le strade e i palazzi emergono simili a linee e punti, mentre i vicoli ne definiscono le sfumature riempiendo lo spazio vuoto, come in un dipinto tradizionale cinese". Questo è l'incipit del romanzo del 1995 di Wang Anyi "La canzone dell'eterno rimpianto" (长恨歌)lilong_sample_paint_700

Secondo quanto descritto da Wang nel suo racconto, i longtang sembrano incarnare l'anima della cultura di Shanghai che è sopravvissuta nonostante una storia brutale, ma è ora vicina a svanire: "In mezzo alla foresta dei nuovi grattaceli, questi vecchi quartieri longtang sono come una flotta di navi affondate, i loro scafi si svelano mano a mano che il mare si ritira" dice ancora Wang Anyi.
Lilong里弄 è in termine Shanghainese per definire un Longtang 弄堂 "case a schiera" cioè un insieme di case che riprendono il layout compositivo delle case a schiera londinesi della metà dell’Ottocento, ripensate sulla base delle tipologie abitative cinesi preesistenti.
Lilong: "Li" significa quartiere, "Long" significa vicolo (lanes in inglese). Queste due parole combinate, descrivono una tipologia di abitazioni che hanno caratterizzato per 150 anni la città di Shanghai. Indissolubilmente connessi con la crescita della città tra il 1840 e il 1949, gli insediamenti Lilong costituivano la maggior parte del patrimonio abitativo della città fino alla fine del ventesimo secolo.

Nel 1963, il Comitato Centrale del Partito Comunista di Shanghai definisce i Lilong come: "l'avamposto della lotta di classe, il caposaldo della produzione, un luogo di vita e un importante presidio per la battaglia del proletariato e la sconfitta della borghesia".

Struttura dei Longtang
L'insediamento lilong è una struttura dal profilo basso, radicata a Lilong-Settlement_400terra che offre agli abitanti numerosi vantaggi: una organizzazione gerarchica dello spazio, separazione fra aree private e pubbliche, alto livello di sicurezza, forte senso di interazione con il vicinato, coesione sociale ecc. Questi fattori, rendono un quartiere lilong un piacevole luogo per vivere e sono di conseguenza generalmente amati dalla popolazione.Dal punto di vista urbanistico, l'intero insediamento è costituito solitamente da due vie principali che si incrociano, utilizzate per la circolazione generale, accessibili dalle vie commerciali esterne e dalle vie secondarie che conducono a ciascuna abitazione.
La semplice e razionale struttura degli insediamenti lilong, conferisce un elevato grado di sicurezza e tranquillità all'ambiente di vita interno, in contrasto con i rumorosi dintorni urbani, dominati dallo sviluppo commerciale.
Le unità abitative lungo il perimetro dei lilong sono state generalmente convertire in negozi così come anche alcune abitazioni, all’interno dell’insediamento, hanno integrato attività commerciali a conduzione famigliare, per fornire servizi alla comunità.
Le case shikumen ( 石库门"Case con l'ingresso di pietra"), tipiche dei primi longtang, furono originariamente costruite, dopo la prima guerra dell'oppio del 1842, per accogliere famiglie facoltose, diplomatici, dirigenti e cittadini della classe media che andavano popolando le concessioni straniere di Shanghai dopo il trattato di Nanchino.Shanghai-longtang_paint_600
Ma gradatamente la manutenzione degli edifici si interruppe, la densità della popolazione aumentò, le strutture diventarono fuori moda, gli edifici si fecero fatiscenti, quindi le condizioni di vita generale degradarono. Fu così che alcuni quartieri cambiarono di rango e furono occupati da classi sociali sempre più povere fino a trasformarsi talvolta in baraccopoli.

Evoluzione dei longtang
Mentre le forze della globalizzazione imperversano nel mondo, molte città, specialmente nei paesi in via di sviluppo, si affannano nel tentativo di recuperare il ritardo del loro progresso economico e sociale, dismettendo in modo massivo le comunità a bassa densità abitativa, per soddisfare la crescente domanda di abitazioni.
Così il patrimonio urbano muore gradatamente per trasformarsi in un ambiente disordinato e alienante, grazie alla frenetica realizzazione di progetti per alloggi di massa costruiti in serie.
A partire dalle riforme economiche del 1990, uomini e donne da tutta la Cina sono confluiti a Shanghai alla ricerca di migliori opportunità di lavoro, fino a provocare la crisi degli alloggi. Per soddisfare l'esplosiva richiesta di case, il governo approvò la riforma detta "sweep-out" (spazzare) per sostituire le case a bassa densità abitativa con enormi ma inospitali grattaceli.
Visto da un punto i vista architettonico e urbanistico, tutto ciò ha diminuito la diversità architettonica di questa storica città, distruggendo il tessuto urbano originale e cambiando lo stile di vita sociale.

Bisogna dire comunque, che vivere in un longtang non è esente da problemi: non c'è molta privacy in questo ambiente, i vicini cucinano insieme e di solito consumano i pasti all'aperto, gomito a gomito con gli altri inquilini, bagni e lavanderie sono in comune e se ci sono litigi fra famiglie, ognuno nel quartiere ne risulterà coinvolto. Di conseguenza, i cittadini sono spesso favorevoli a lasciare il loro quartiere per spostarsi in abitazioni più 'moderne' ma solitamente non sono consci del grande cambiamento che si produrrà nel loro stile di vita.
Il quartiere storico e culturalmente ricco, muore insieme alle case tradizionali.
Gli errori compiuti a Shanghai, risulteranno comunque palesi a chiunque conosca le problematiche della pianificazione urbana e dello sviluppo del territorio. Dopo tutto, molti degli errori che Shanghai sta commettendo sono errori di cui il nord America e l'Europa sono stati pionieri.
La questione che si pone ora è, se è possibile preservare lo stile tradizionale di vita di strada in presenza dei modelli sociali contemporanei, dell'aumento della popolazione e della crescita economica.

Il destino dei lilong dovrà essere necessariamente quello di evolvere in orrendi e impersonali grattacieli o trasformarsi in quartieri Disneyani?
E’ possibile organizzare gli spazi di una città come Shanghai in modo da preservare quella vitalità dei quartieri che promuove i rapporti interpersonali e la vita di comunità?
Dopo anni di demolizioni su larga scala, specialmente in occasione del World Expo del 2010, quando gli abitanti provenienti da decine di migliaia di abitazioni longtang sono stati trasferiti in aree ad alta densità nelle periferie della città, il governo ha improvvisamente iniziato a propagandare i lilong come rappresentativi di una esclusiva "Cultura di Shanghai", iniziando quindi dei programmi di recupero.
In seguito a numerosi tentativi controversi si poi giunti a quattro tipologie di approccio principali, che si sono concretizzate in alcuni progetti già conclusi e altri in via di realizzazione.
In un caso, una ricostruzione tesa a preservare la forma esterna degli edifici, modificando la destinazione d'uso ai soli fini commerciali, come negozi, ristoranti e bar. Questo modello salva la forma esteriore, ma ne limita l'uso, rendendoli privi di anima. Un esempio di questo tipo è costituito dal 'Shanghai Xintiandi Project'. "Xintiandi oggi, non costituisce niente di più di un guscio, [] la vita che rese questo posto veramente interessante è sparita, forse per sempre", scrive Wang.
La tipologia delle abitazioni lilong può variare di molto, da abitazioni misere a palazzi di lusso, di conseguenza, in presenza di un patrimonio architettonico di alto profilo come nel quartiere della 'Citè Bourgogne' nella Concessione Francese, il restauro diviene mirato a conservare la funzione abitativa, ma a progetto compiuto, la coesistenza di gruppi sociali differenti e scarsamente integrati, impedisce la creazione di una reale comunità sociale.
Altro approccio ancora, è costituito dalla trasformazione delle case lilong in un parco delle arti che includa gallerie, studi di artisti, negozi d'arte e coffe shops, mantenendo invece una parte dedicata agli usi residenziali. E' questo il caso del "Tianzifang project". Anche qui, tuttavia lo spirito originale del quartiere è andato in gran parte perduto e a causa del notevole aumento del turismo e della vita notturna, si sono create molte situazioni di caos e di conflitto con le comunità circostanti.
Tuttavia, questo metodo 'dal basso' nato dalla iniziativa dei comitati di quartiere è senz'altro meglio riuscito di progetti 'dall'alto' come Xintinadi, frutto degli interessi politici ed economici delle classi dominanti.

Il tema
Infine, e veniamo quindi all'argomento di questo reportage, la municipalità di Shanghai ha trasformato alcuni di questi quartieri tradizionali in 'Quartieri Modello' (文明小区 'Model Quarter'), collegandoli a un programma di recupero e dotandoli di un minimo di servizi organizzati, assegnando quindi le abitazioni a persone appartenenti a classi sociali svantaggiate.
Sono personalmente convinto che questo progetto rappresenti un interessante compromesso, ma la precarietà del livello di vita esistente e i profondi interessi economici connessi allo sfruttamento intensivo del territorio, renderanno molto precaria la sopravvivenza nel tempo di questi insediamenti.

Il mio lavoro è focalizzato su alcuni attivi e vitali lilong 'Quartieri Modello' nel distretto di Huangpu, situati attorno a Huangpi (黄陂南路) , nella zona a Sud della stazione metro di Xintiandi (新天地) fra Huahai Road (淮海中路) e Zhao Zhou Road (肇周路).Con queste foto, cerco di offrire una visione genuina dell'ambiente sociale e dello stile di vita di un luogo, relativamente povero, ma tranquillo e piacevole (anche se decisamente caotico), dove sono ancora visibili un alto livello di coesione sociale e la presenza di servizi di base, per quanto inseriti in un contesto molto modesto.

L’esplorazione inizia dalle strade esterne che circondano i lilong, dove ci sono le botteghe, gli spazi pubblici e i servizi, per poi penetrare idealmente nel cuore del quartiere, seguendo i vicoli principali e secondari ad incontrare i personaggi e i luoghi dove essi mangiano, chiacchierano, giocano, dormono, vivono insomma.

Le fotografie non mostrano eleganti palazzi, ambasciate, abitazioni in stile occidentale, nessuna architettura pubblica, monumento e nemmeno simpatici giardini. Nessuno dei simboli del fastoso passato coloniale o degli avveniristici palazzi della Shanghai del ventunesimo secolo. Non vedremo nemmeno le eleganti abitazioni Skikumen, lo stile originario degli insediamenti longtang, con i loro eleganti archi di pietra a proteggere il cortile antistante; questi sono quartieri popolari, semplici ed ordinari. Proprio in questa semplicità, in questa ordinarietà dimessa, in questo clima da 'case popolari' ho trovato una dimensione di quiete, una sensazione di calore, un 'ricordo'.

Queste immagini sono solo frammenti della vita di tutti i giorni: lavoro, divertimento, noia. L'anticipazione della nostalgia per le cose che stanno scomparendo.
Dice ancora Wang Anyi in una intervista:

“Tu puoi dire che un longtang è un certo tipo di architettura, ma in realtà, è uno stile di vita”